The Impeccable Integrity of Ruby R By Moni Mohsin | Book Review

Utterly enamoured with erstwhile superstar Saif Haq, twenty-three-year old Ruby gives up here scholarship in London and follows him back home to become a social media manager for his party that promises to change the political face of Pakistan. But even with someone as upright as Saif, politics is a moral minefield and Ruby struggles with the choices demanded of her. Resented and admired by her colleagues, favoured by Saif, Ruby appears unstoppable until one day when Saif asks her to prove her loyalty by making the most painful sacrifice of all.

Wish You Were Here by Jodi Picoult | Book Review

Diana, with her perfectly planned life, is all set to fly to the Galápagos where she's convinced her surgeon boyfriend, Finn, is going to propose. But then the virus hits New York City and Finn is needed at the hospital so Diana travels alone. Once she's in the Galápagos, the world shuts down around her, leaving Diana stranded - albeit in paradise. Completely isolated, with only intermittent news from the outside world, Diana finds herself examining everything that has brought her to this point and wondering if there's a better way to live. But not everything is as it seems...

The Stranger in the Lifeboat by Mitch Albom | Book Review

Adrift in a raft after a terrible shipwreck, ten strangers try to survive while they wait for rescue. After three days, short on water, food and hope, they spot a man floating in the waves. They pull him on board - and the survivor claims he can save them. But should they put their trust in him? Will any of them see home again? And why did the ship really sink?

Art Matters by Neil Gaiman | Book Review

Neil Gaiman once said that 'the world always seems brighter when you've just made something that wasn't there before'. This little book is the embodiment of that vision. Drawn together from speeches, poems and creative manifestos, Art Matters explores how reading, imagining and creating can change the world, and will be inspirational to young and old.

Megamonster by David Walliams | Book Review

On a volcanic island, in the middle of shark-infested waters, stands The Cruel School with its appalling lessons, revolting dinners and terrifying teachers – especially the mysterious Science teacher Doctor Doktur.
When Larker is sent here, she quickly realises something very odd is going on… something involving Doctor Doktur and a ‘Monsterfication Machine’. Ultimately, she finds herself face to face with a real life Megamonster.
There seems to be no escape – but for Larker, nothing is impossible.

The L-Word by Aastha Atray Banan | Book Review

Love can be many things - sometimes intimidating, frustrating, and often exhilarating. The L-Word is about modern love: from ghosting, polyamory, love in the times of social media to more every-day problems like dealing with heartbreak, infidelity and getting out of toxic relationships. This book tells you how to make sense of it all.

The Secret Life of Debbie G. by Vibha Batra, Kalyani Ganapathy | Book Review

Sixteen-year-old Debbie wanted to mess with the Invincibles (the superbrats) and in doing so her online persona became a sensation. Riding high on the wave of popularity, she began hitting out at everyone, even the Incredibles (the geeks) and the Invisibles (the losers). In a world where the number of likes, comments, shares, DMs and followers determine a teenager's sense of self-worth, how will her newly-acquired celebrity status influence her behaviour and affect her emotional health?

The Eighth Girl by Maxine Mei-Fung Chung | Book Review

Alexa Wú’s chaotic life is controlled by a series of alternate personalities. Only three people know about their existence: her therapist Daniel, her stepmother Anna, and her best friend Ella. When Ella gets a job at a high-end gentleman's club, she is gradually drawn into London's cruel underbelly. With lives at stake, Alexa follows her on a daring rescue mission. Threatened and vulnerable, she will discover whether her multiple personalities are her greatest asset, or her biggest obstacle.

Written in the Stars by Divya Anand | Book Review

When all efforts to land her that elusive promotion fail, Sitara decides to use the new marketing head's obsession with his horoscope to her advantage. Except, she is so focused on the career section of his horoscope that she doesn't pay attention to the personal section. Hilarity ensues when the star-crossed signals result in him pursuing Sitara romantically. Faced with choosing what she really wants, she must chart her own course even if what she has in mind may not be what the stars ordained.

The Lost Art of Doing Nothing by Maartje Willems, Lona Aalders | Book Review

Our lives are so crammed that it leaves little-to-no time for rest. When we do set aside time, we invariably get caught up in thinking of the next item on our to-do list or organising a drawer full of pens. Work, chats, chores, meeting friends - all of these demand time and attention and #FOMO keeps us from stepping back or cancelling plans to simple relax. But what if you could replace #FOMO with #JOMO a.k.a the joy of missing out? Welcome to the world of Niksen - the Dutch art of doing nothing.

The Art of Papercraft by Helen Hiebert | Book Review

Whether you're a crafting beginner, artist or designer, this book with 40 unique projects ideas, all made with a single sheet of paper, offers a rich variety of papercraft techniques. With step by step illustrations, this is a great way to explore the diversity of paper as a medium and learn how to make stunning projects.

Of This Our Country: An Anthology | Book Review

Personal essays from acclaimed and upcoming Nigerian writers detail the realities and contradictions of patriotism, examine the role of class and privilege in Nigerian society, juxtapose inherited tradition with the diasporic experience and explore the power of storytelling and its intrinsic link to Nigeria’s history. Within these pages, the writers share memories and experiences of Nigeria that can be found nowhere else, bringing to the fore a country whose influence can be found everywhere.

Audrey Hepburn by Robert Matzen | Book Review

Twenty-eight years after her passing, Audrey Hepburn remains the most beloved of all Hollywood stars, known as much for her role as UNICEF ambassador as for films like Roman Holiday and Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Several biographies have chronicled her stardom, but none has covered her intense experiences through five years of Nazi occupation in the Netherlands or her humanitarian work with UNICEF.

Dutch Girl and Warrior remove the glossy Hollywood filter and show the woman behind the camera and arc lights.