The L-Word by Aastha Atray Banan | Book Review

Love can be many things - sometimes intimidating, frustrating, and often exhilarating. The L-Word is about modern love: from ghosting, polyamory, love in the times of social media to more every-day problems like dealing with heartbreak, infidelity and getting out of toxic relationships. This book tells you how to make sense of it all.

The Eighth Girl by Maxine Mei-Fung Chung | Book Review

Alexa Wú’s chaotic life is controlled by a series of alternate personalities. Only three people know about their existence: her therapist Daniel, her stepmother Anna, and her best friend Ella. When Ella gets a job at a high-end gentleman's club, she is gradually drawn into London's cruel underbelly. With lives at stake, Alexa follows her on a daring rescue mission. Threatened and vulnerable, she will discover whether her multiple personalities are her greatest asset, or her biggest obstacle.

Written in the Stars by Divya Anand | Book Review

When all efforts to land her that elusive promotion fail, Sitara decides to use the new marketing head's obsession with his horoscope to her advantage. Except, she is so focused on the career section of his horoscope that she doesn't pay attention to the personal section. Hilarity ensues when the star-crossed signals result in him pursuing Sitara romantically. Faced with choosing what she really wants, she must chart her own course even if what she has in mind may not be what the stars ordained.

The Art of Papercraft by Helen Hiebert | Book Review

Whether you're a crafting beginner, artist or designer, this book with 40 unique projects ideas, all made with a single sheet of paper, offers a rich variety of papercraft techniques. With step by step illustrations, this is a great way to explore the diversity of paper as a medium and learn how to make stunning projects.

Of This Our Country: An Anthology | Book Review

Personal essays from acclaimed and upcoming Nigerian writers detail the realities and contradictions of patriotism, examine the role of class and privilege in Nigerian society, juxtapose inherited tradition with the diasporic experience and explore the power of storytelling and its intrinsic link to Nigeria’s history. Within these pages, the writers share memories and experiences of Nigeria that can be found nowhere else, bringing to the fore a country whose influence can be found everywhere.

Audrey Hepburn by Robert Matzen | Book Review

Twenty-eight years after her passing, Audrey Hepburn remains the most beloved of all Hollywood stars, known as much for her role as UNICEF ambassador as for films like Roman Holiday and Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Several biographies have chronicled her stardom, but none has covered her intense experiences through five years of Nazi occupation in the Netherlands or her humanitarian work with UNICEF.

Dutch Girl and Warrior remove the glossy Hollywood filter and show the woman behind the camera and arc lights.

Freckles by Cecelia Ahern | Book Review

You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.
When a stranger utters these words to Allegra Bird, nicknamed Freckles, it turns her highly ordered life upside down, leading her to ask the question she’s been avoiding for so long: who are the people who made her the way she is? And who are the five people who can shape and determine her future?
Just as she once joined the freckles on her skin to mirror the constellations in the night sky, she must once again look for connections.

Digital Body Language by Erica Dhawan | Book Review

Humans rely on body language to connect and build trust, but with most of our communication happening from behind a screen, traditional body language signals are no longer visible. Digital Body Language will turn your daily misunderstandings into a set of collectively understood laws that foster connection, no matter the distance. Dhawan investigates a wide array of exchanges and offers insights and solutions to build trust and clarity to anyone in our ever changing world.

Pretty as a Picture by Elizabeth Little | Book Review

Film editor Marissa jumps at the chance to travel to a small island to work with the legendary – and legendarily demanding – director, Tony Rees. Soon she discovers there are rumours of accidents and indiscretions, of burgeoning scandals and perilous schemes on set. In the midst of this chaos, Marissa is herself drawn into an amateur investigation of the real-life murder that is the movie’s central subject. The only problem is the killer may still be on the loose. And he might not be done.

Yours Cheerfully by A J Pearce | Book Review

London, Nov. 1941. Following the departure of Henrietta Bird from Woman’s Friend magazine, things are looking up for Emmy Lake. When the Ministry of Information calls on Britain’s women’s magazines to help recruit desperately needed female workers to the war effort, Emmy meets a young woman who shows them the very real challenges they face. Now, Emmy must tackle a life-changing dilemma between doing her duty and standing by her friends. This is the delightfully uplifting sequel to Dear Mrs. Bird you cannot afford to miss.

The Lies We Tell by Jane Corry | Book Review

Sarah always thought of herself and her husband, Tom, as good people. But that was before their son Freddy came home saying he'd done something terrible, begging them not to tell the police. Soon Sarah and Tom must find out just how far they are willing to push themselves, and their marriage, to protect their only child. As the lies build up and Sarah is presented with the perfect opportunity to get Freddy off the hook, she is faced with a terrifying decision: Save her son... or save herself?

Unbreak Your Heart by Katie Marsh | Book Review

Seven-year-old Jake’s heart is failing so he decides to find Simon, his single dad, someone to love before he goes. Beth is determined to forget the past. But even with starting afresh in a Lake District village, she can’t shake the secrets that haunt her. Simon has no time to find someone new when every day is a struggle to earn a living while caring for his beloved son. But Jake is determined his plan will succeed – and what unfolds will change all three of them forever.

How to Save a Life by Eva Carter | Book Review

It’s nearly midnight on the eve of the millennium when eighteen-year-old Joel’s heart stops. Kerry performs CPR for eighteen exhausting minutes while her best friend Tim freezes, unable to help. That moment of life and death changes the course of all three lives over the next two decades because sometimes saving a life is only the start of the story...

The Secret Life of Albert Entwistle by Matt Cain | Book Review

Albert Entwistle is a postman. It is one of the few things everyone knows about him and one of the few things he is comfortable with people knowing. That’s because Albert carries a secret. But soon it will be his 65th birthday and he will be forced to retire. With no friends and nothing to look forward to, he realises it's finally time to be honest about who he is. And he must find the courage to look for George, the man that, many years ago, he lost - but has never forgotten.

Lost Property by Helen Paris | Book Review

Dot’s life has become a bit stuck. The big dreams she once had are beginning to fade away as she works each day in the Baker Street Lost Property office. Until one day someone enters her life and unlocks a new determination inside her. After all, everything that’s lost belongs somewhere. Maybe now it’s Dot’s turn to be found…