Write It All Down by Cathy Rentzenbrink | Book Review

Why do we want to write and what stops us? How do we fight the worry that no-one will care what we have to say? What can we do to overcome the obstacles in our way? Sunday Times bestselling author Cathy Rentzenbrink shows you how to tackle all this and more in Write It All Down, a guide to putting your life on the page.

Equations by Shivani Sibal | Book Review

Two boys grow up together in the same house as childhood playmates. One is the son of the owner and the other is the son of the owner's driver. They both become aware of their place in the world as they grow older. But one of them has big ambitions reaching far beyond domestic servitude. This a story of aspiration and social change, of individual ambition and family bonds, set in the secret world of New Delhi's political and business families.

Quiet Power by Susan Cain | Book Review

Childhood, adolescence and your early twenties are times wrought with insecurity and self-doubt. Your search for your place in the world can seem daunting. Focusing on the strengths and challenges of being introverted, Quiet Power applies the breakthrough discoveries of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can't Stop Talking to young readers that so badly need them.

The Stranger in the Lifeboat by Mitch Albom | Book Review

Adrift in a raft after a terrible shipwreck, ten strangers try to survive while they wait for rescue. After three days, short on water, food and hope, they spot a man floating in the waves. They pull him on board - and the survivor claims he can save them. But should they put their trust in him? Will any of them see home again? And why did the ship really sink?

The L-Word by Aastha Atray Banan | Book Review

Love can be many things - sometimes intimidating, frustrating, and often exhilarating. The L-Word is about modern love: from ghosting, polyamory, love in the times of social media to more every-day problems like dealing with heartbreak, infidelity and getting out of toxic relationships. This book tells you how to make sense of it all.

The Eighth Girl by Maxine Mei-Fung Chung | Book Review

Alexa Wú’s chaotic life is controlled by a series of alternate personalities. Only three people know about their existence: her therapist Daniel, her stepmother Anna, and her best friend Ella. When Ella gets a job at a high-end gentleman's club, she is gradually drawn into London's cruel underbelly. With lives at stake, Alexa follows her on a daring rescue mission. Threatened and vulnerable, she will discover whether her multiple personalities are her greatest asset, or her biggest obstacle.

Written in the Stars by Divya Anand | Book Review

When all efforts to land her that elusive promotion fail, Sitara decides to use the new marketing head's obsession with his horoscope to her advantage. Except, she is so focused on the career section of his horoscope that she doesn't pay attention to the personal section. Hilarity ensues when the star-crossed signals result in him pursuing Sitara romantically. Faced with choosing what she really wants, she must chart her own course even if what she has in mind may not be what the stars ordained.

The Art of Papercraft by Helen Hiebert | Book Review

Whether you're a crafting beginner, artist or designer, this book with 40 unique projects ideas, all made with a single sheet of paper, offers a rich variety of papercraft techniques. With step by step illustrations, this is a great way to explore the diversity of paper as a medium and learn how to make stunning projects.

Of This Our Country: An Anthology | Book Review

Personal essays from acclaimed and upcoming Nigerian writers detail the realities and contradictions of patriotism, examine the role of class and privilege in Nigerian society, juxtapose inherited tradition with the diasporic experience and explore the power of storytelling and its intrinsic link to Nigeria’s history. Within these pages, the writers share memories and experiences of Nigeria that can be found nowhere else, bringing to the fore a country whose influence can be found everywhere.

Audrey Hepburn by Robert Matzen | Book Review

Twenty-eight years after her passing, Audrey Hepburn remains the most beloved of all Hollywood stars, known as much for her role as UNICEF ambassador as for films like Roman Holiday and Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Several biographies have chronicled her stardom, but none has covered her intense experiences through five years of Nazi occupation in the Netherlands or her humanitarian work with UNICEF.

Dutch Girl and Warrior remove the glossy Hollywood filter and show the woman behind the camera and arc lights.

Freckles by Cecelia Ahern | Book Review

You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.
When a stranger utters these words to Allegra Bird, nicknamed Freckles, it turns her highly ordered life upside down, leading her to ask the question she’s been avoiding for so long: who are the people who made her the way she is? And who are the five people who can shape and determine her future?
Just as she once joined the freckles on her skin to mirror the constellations in the night sky, she must once again look for connections.