Bag it All by Nina Lekhi | Book Review

I first came across the Baggit Brand in 1999. It was at the Shoppers Stop in New Delhi – A first-of-its-kind store that had opened at the first shopping mall in the city. With all those firsts, naturally, my friends and I were curious enough to make our way over one morning, after having finished an early class at college.

Being the bag lover I was, I distinctly remember being drawn to the product displayed at the Baggit counter. I was amazed at their price tags; couldn’t believe my eyes. I came out of the store that day with my first adult wallet. It was a beige compact tri-fold by Baggit which I went on to use for the next few years. Served me well too.

When I heard about this book about the Brand and its Founder, I was reminded of that first purchase and was curious to learn more about them.

The seeds for Baggit were planted by Nina Lekhi at the young age of 18 when she failed her First year of Commercial Art. What started in one half of the children’s bedroom in her parents’ house, only as a means to move forward from her failure and to prove herself, has today grown into a 100+ crore company.

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Along the way, Lekhi became a wife and mom, and navigated the new paths and destinations of her life. As the business grew, she roped in the support of her family who continue to be actively involved in the running of the Brand alongside her.

During her journey, she also came across Siddha Samadhi Yoga and became an ardent follower. She has imbibed their principles to maintain work-life balance as well as create a harmonious work ethic at her company, which has yielded profitable returns in both spheres of her life.

Bag it All is a management lesson that unfolds right before you on its pages. Lekhi tells her story of how the brand was created, the risks she took, and the practices she adopted.

The book is broken down into chapters that progress through the growing phases of the business, while also imparting a valuable entrepreneurial lesson at the end. She shares the practices that worked, as well as the mistakes that taught her valuable lessons.

Lekhi strongly believes that women can have it all –  A loving family, a successful company, and the opportunity to follow our passion. She reveals the secrets of her inspirational success story, that comes with a full serving of hard work and determination, along with a generous helping of good design and aesthetic which helped her take off.

In doing all this, she has created lasting business relationships with her employees, vendors, and clients, which go a long way in making Baggit the successful company it is today.

Title: Bag it All
Author: Nina Lekhi as told to Suman Chhabria Addepalli
Publisher: Jaico Publishing House
ISBN: 978-81-8495-981-9
Edition/Year: First Edition 2017
Format: Paperback
Genre:  Non-Fiction – Business, Entrepreneurship
Pages: 250
Source: Personal Copy
Rating: 5 Stars

Available on Amazon.

About the Author: Nina Lekhi is Founder, MD and Chief Design Curator of Baggit India, a market leader in bags and accessories. She has won several prestigious awards from the Indian government and media for her contributions. Baggit has achieved recognition from PETA for being a cruelty-free, vegan brand. Nina is an ardent follower of Siddha Samadhi Yoga (SSY) and maintains work-life balance by shuttling between Mumbai and the hills of Katarkhadak village (adopted by her to ensure rural employment and overall welfare) with her husband and daughter.
She can be reached on Twitter @ninalekhi.

Picture Source: aquamarineflavours.wordpress.com

A Bookish Love Story in 2016

Book wise, 2016 has been a great year. I have discovered and read some marvellous books that have left a profound impact on me. Books that I will continue to revisit, to refresh my memory of the stories they tell and my experiences of reading them.

Those of you who know, I read many, many books. I consider it no less than a personal achievement to be able to cross a count of over one hundred books, for the second consecutive year.

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I am often asked how I manage to do it. It’s simple, really. I make it a point to read a little every night before I sleep. 50-100 pages is more than enough for me. Unless a particular book has me in its clutches and refuses to let go. Of course, I also read whenever I can manage during the day. Which is why I always carry a few books on my tablet, phone, or as paperbacks, wherever I go.

Some may think that reading books at such an insane pace is not really reading. It is just a count. A statistic. Well, I beg to differ. For me, every book gives me an opportunity to travel into a world I may not otherwise be a part of. It makes me question myself how I would react were I thrown in a similar situation. It allows me to fall in love with some delightful characters and, at the same time, strategise my move (hypothetically, of course) when stuck in a difficult situation.

As someone once said, “It is not about how many books you read, but what you do after reading them”.

Every story has the power to make you dream and to teach you lessons you may not learn in real life. All you have to do is keep your eyes and ears open and enjoy the journey.

About the 100+ books I read in 2016 – Here is a quick overview of some interesting reading statistics upon completion of my reading challenge. (I pulled some of these off Goodreads’ Year in Books):
Total number of books = 108 (plus a short story that was a bonus read of sorts, to a thriller novel in series).
Total number of pages = Approx. 32,300 pages. An average of less than 85 pages a day. Quite workable.
Shortest book = The Lively Library and An Unlikely Romance by Niranjan Navalgund (Novella) at 96 pages
Longest book = The Sialkot Saga by Ashwin Sanghi at 588 pages
Most popular book = To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Need I say more?
Highest rated book on Goodreads = Birds of Prey by Archana Sarat. This also features in my list of top favourite books this year.
Number of Non-Fiction Books = 11. At only 10% of my total reading, I would like to read more non-fiction next year.
Number of books by Indian/Indian Origin Authors = 37. More or less, this was steady at the percentage of books read in 2016 as compared to 2015.
Number of books translated to English from other Indian or Foreign languages = 10. Definitely need to add more of these next year.
Most books read in a month = 17 in September. I was also reviewing quite a few books this month.
Least books read in a month = 3 in December. This month has mostly been taken up in meeting writing deadlines, which clearly ate into my reading time.

As last year, I again decided to pick my favourite books of the ones I read in 2016. So, without further ado, here are my top reads from this year – categorised by Indian and International authors, in Fiction and Non-Fiction:

Indian Fiction (in random order)

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1. Chander & Sudha – Dharamvir Bharati (Translated by Poonam Saxena)
This was deeply moving and intense, especially considering the era it was written in. Also, Poonam Saxena’s translation of this novel, originally written in Hindi, is exquisite in the way it keeps to that old world charm.

 

 

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2. The Private Life of Mrs. Sharma – Ratika Kapur
With a simple, realistic prose, it takes you through a woman’s mundane family life – her desires and actions, until suddenly everything gets out of hand. Then, it delivers a knockout punch that leaves you reeling with shock. I couldn’t have imagined in my wildest dreams, that this is how it would all end.

 

63-ghachar-ghochar3. Ghachar Ghochar – Vivek Shanbhag (Translated by Srinath Perur)
The most action you get to read here is about the ant infestation in an old home where dealing with it becomes a way of life. Yet the story seems to pull you into a knot with its simplicity as you continue to read, wondering where it is heading. Until it ends with a strong note of a deep sinister reality. Ghachar Ghochar is one those books that leave you mystified and spellbound at the same time.

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4. 03:02 – Mainak Dhar
This is an action-packed thriller that starts off as compelling Sci-Fi. As you turn page after page, you forget it is written by an Indian Author. With a multi layered dimension to the unfolding mystery, it also deals with social hierarchy with respect to wealth, in the face of tragedy.

 

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5. Birds of Prey – Archana Sarat
A Debut Author’s remarkable portrayal of a subject that plagues our society, handled with the tenderness and sensitivity it craves. Birds of Prey is as horrific in the crime it reveals, as it is subliminal about the state of our society.

 

 

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6. The Bharat Series – Ashwin Sanghi
In a twitter chat, I once had the opportunity to ask the author – What brought the innovative idea of writing thrillers that travel & connect through centuries. He answered – Because historical patterns repeat themselves. And we are much more connected in the ancient than we imagine.
One has to have read his books to understand how he manifests this idea in his stories to create blockbuster mythological thrillers. Until I read his books, I couldn’t have imagined how much I would love them.

 

 

International Fiction (in random order)
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1. The Butterfly Series & The End of Innocence – Moni Mohsin
Whether it a poignant reminder of The End of Innocence or the grammatically deprived adventures of Butterfly Khan, Moni Mohsin’s writing is bound to have you hooked.

 

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2. David Baldacci, Harlan Coben, Joseph Finder, Ian Rankin and John Sandford
I need to read their books to satisfy the thriller junkie in me. They are my bread & butter of reading.

 

 

 

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3. The Devotion of Suspect X, Salvation of a Saint & A Midsumer’s Qquation – Keigo Higashino
This Japanese Author starts off his novels with a murder that almost takes place in front of the reader. Then he goes about an investigation that beats any other murder mystery hands down.

 

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4. Crazy Rich Asians & China Rich Girlfriend – Kevin Kwan
He proved that Crazy Rich Asians are the same everywhere. Be it China, India or anywhere else.

 

 

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5. A Man Called Ove & My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry – Fredrik Backman
This Swedish Author had me going back to his books over and over again despite the heartache they put me through. These books shall remain with me forever.

 

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6. The Martian – Andy Weir
If you really want to enjoy the story, read the book before you watch the movie. You’ll thank me later.

 

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7. To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
A classic. I don’t know how I managed to deprive myself of it all these years. I loved everything about this novel. Can’t say so about the sequel though.

 

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8. Me Before You – Jojo Moyes
This one almost had me fooled at the blissfulness of love, before it ended with a heart-breaking reality. A truly beautiful love story.

 

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9. What Alice Forgot – Liane Moriarty
I categorised this one as devastatingly beautiful & devilishly romantic. A friend suggested it to me, saying this was a book she wished she had written. After I read it, that was exactly how I felt too.

 

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10. Orphan X – Gregg Hurwitz
Think Super Hero, think Orphan X. One man who is all your favourite superheroes combined. All I can say is that the sequel can’t come out soon enough.

 

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11. Most Wanted – Lisa Scottoline
Another terrific book recommended by a friend, it unfolds an unimaginable possibility while a woman struggles to start a family. The author narrates both the pain, and the thrill of the plot with equal finesse.

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12. Dying for Christmas – Tammy Cohen
At one point I thought I had made a huge mistake picking up this book. But once I got through the difficult part, it was an intense psycho-crime thriller that goes beyond the darkest you can imagine. Think way beyond Gone Girl and the Girl on the Train. Read only if you have the heart and stomach for it.

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13. The Woman in Cabin 10 – Ruth Ware
A pure murder mystery that, believe me when I say I am not exaggerating, almost gave me a heart attack. A heart-stopping thriller!

 

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14. First Comes Love – Emily Giffin
Emily Giffin has this way of exploring relationships in her stories that make you look at your own life, and the people in it, in a new light. Another author I have come to love.

 

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15. Where’d You Go, Bernadette – Maria Semple
This book is so hilarious that you don’t, not for a single moment, want to stop reading it. Told by a fifteen-year-old girl, it also reveals a poignant relationship between a family and the circumstances that lead to a mysteriously interesting turn of events.

 

104-the-chopin-manuscript106-the-copper-bracelet16. The Chopin Manuscript & The Copper Bracelet – The collaborative writings of Jeffery Deaver & Others
This was my first time listening to an Audio book. I picked it up when I read a post on Joseph Finder’s Facebook wall, of this collaborative novel he had written. I started with the Chopin Manuscript and was hooked to it. Alfred Molina’s narration is stupendous. It led me to listen to the sequel, The Copper Bracelet, also narrated by Alfred Molina. Needless to say, I am looking into getting an Audible subscription next year.

 

International Non-Fiction (in random order)
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1. If Someone Says “You Complete Me”, RUN! – Whoopi Goldberg
Now this a book I think should be mandatory reading for girls and young women. The legendary actress gives us a peek into her private life to teach some valuable lessons of life.

 

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2. Leading – Alex Ferguson (with Michael Moritz)
A chronicle of the rise of Manchester United through the practices they embraced. It teaches Leadership and Management through football.

 

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3. The Perfection of the Paper Clip – James Ward
A history of the invention, development and improvement of basic, everyday stationery items. How could a stationery aficionado like me pass up an opportunity to read this?

 

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4. Sully: My Search for What Really Matters – Chesley B. Sullenberger
With all the hype surrounding Tom Hanks’ film, I wanted to read about Sully, the pilot who landed a plane on the Hudson without any loss of life. In his autobiography, he reveals the man behind the hero and the experiences that equipped him to avert one of the biggest disasters in aviation history. Again, book before film.

 

If you’re interested, you can find a complete list of all the books I read in 2016, here.

My review and rating for these books is available on my Goodreads account.

I also tweet about the books I read, in as much as 140 characters allow. You can always find me writing about the latest book to catch my fancy, at https://twitter.com/AshieJayn.

This year I started reviewing books, although occasionally. These reviews are published on this blog as well as on Amazon and Goodreads. I hope to keep at it next year as well.

I was recently approached by a published author to beta-read the manuscript of her next novel. It was a first for me and sounded extremely exciting so I accepted. It’s been a few days into the exercise and I am thoroughly enjoying it.

As for 2017, I am armed and ready with a fresh new set of books to start the year with. New paperbacks have arrived and the tablet has been loaded with eBooks.

If you like this post, do share with your reader friends. And tell me all about the books that you fell in love with, in the comments below.

I hope you have had a wonderful 2016 and I wish you a Bookish 2017. Read all the books that make you happy. They don’t necessarily have to be classics or award winners!

My 2016 Reading Challenge

With the year coming to a close, I am finally bringing down the curtain on my reading for 2016.

Here is a complete list of the 108 books I read as part of the Brunch Book Challenge, run by the Hindustan Times’ Sunday Magazine HT Brunch from January to December, 2016.

To know more on the books that found a special place in my heart – click here.

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1. The Diary of a Social Butterfly – Moni Mohsin
2. The Return of the Butterfly – Moni Mohsin
3. Tender Hooks – Moni Mohsin
4. The Forty Rules of Love – Elif Shafak
5. It’s Your Life – Vinita Dawra Nangia
6. The End of Innocence – Moni Mohsin
7. The Rozabal Line – Ashwin Sanghi
8. The Year of the Runaways – Sunjeev Sahota
9. Arranged Marriage: Stories – Chitra B. Divakaruni
10. The Room on the Roof – Ruskin Bond
11. The Martian – Andy Weir
12. Chander & Sudha – Dharamvir Bharati (Translated by Poonam Saxena)
13. If Someone Says “You Complete Me”, RUN! – Whoopi Goldberg
14. To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
15. Go Set A Watchman – Harper Lee
16. Extraordinary Powers – Joseph Finder
17. Crazy Rich Asians – Kevin Kwan
18. China Rich Girlfriend – Kevin Kwan
19. One Amazing Thing – Chitra B. Divakaruni
20. Trigger Mortis – Anthony Horowitz
21. The Alchemist – Paulo Coelho
22. Tweenache in the Time of Hashtags – Judy Balan
23. An Evening in Calcutta and Other Stories – K A Abbas
24. Before and Then After Stories – Meenakshi Reddy Madhavan
25. How to be a Literary Sensation – Krishna Shastri Devulapalli
26. Suchitra Sen: The Legend and the Enigma – Shoma A.Chatterji
27. The Success Sutra: An Indian Approach to Wealth – Devdutt Pattanaik
28. Matchbox: Stories by Ashapurna Debi (Translated by Prasenjit Gupta)
29. In Search of Mary: The Mother of all Journeys – Bee Rowlatt
30. The Way Things Were – Aatish Taseer
31. Leading – Alex Ferguson (with Michael Moritz)
32. High Crimes – Joseph Finder
33. Vanished – Joseph Finder
34. Buried Secrets – Joseph Finder
34b. (Additional Bonus Read) Plan B: A Nick Heller Short Story – Joseph Finder
35. The Private Life of Mrs. Sharma – Ratika Kapur
36. Finding Audrey – Sophie Kinsella
37. Me Before You – Jojo Moyes
38. After You – Jojo Moyes
39. The Perfection of the Paper Clip – James Ward
40. What Alice Forgot – Liane Moriarty
41. Brooklyn – Colm Toìbin
42. Orphan X – Gregg Hurwitz
43. Chanakya’s Chant – Ashwin Sanghi
44. One Fifth Avenue – Candace Bushnell
45. The Inheritance of Loss – Kiran Desai
46. The Fool’s Run – John Sandford
47. The Empress File – John Sandford
48. The Devil’s Code – John Sandford
49. The Hanged Man’s Song – John Sandford
50. Knots & Crosses – Ian Rankin
51. Destiny of Shattered Dreams – Nilesh Rathod
52. Making It Up As I Go Along – Marian Keyes
53. The Devotion of Suspect X – Keigo Higashino
54. Salvation of a Saint – Keigo Higashino
55. A Midsummer’s Equation – Keigo Higashino
56. Shelter – Harlan Coben
57. Seconds Away – Harlan Coben
58. Found – Harlan Coben
59. Guilty Minds – Joseph Finder
60. Most Wanted – Lisa Scottoline
61. The Last Mile – David Baldacci
62. The Lively Library – Niranjan Navalgund
63. Ghachar Ghochar – Vivek Shanbhag (Translated by Srinath Perur)
64. Everyone Has a Story – Savi Sharma
65. A Broken Man – Akash Verma
66. Imagine Me Gone – Adam Haslett
67. The Krishna Key – Ashwin Sanghi
68. The Paradise Guest House – Ellen Sussman
69. The Little Paris Bookshop – Nina George
70. Girls in White Dresses – Jennifer Close
71. Devil in Pinstripes – Ravi Subramanian
72. Tell Me A Story (Anthology) – Edited by Ravinder Singh
73. 03:02 – Mainak Dhar
74. A Man Called Ove – Fredrik Backman
75. Hedon – Priyanka Mookerjee
76. Breaking Free – Neha Nayak
77. Graffiti – Joanie Pariera
78. The Accident Season – Moira Fowley-Doyle
79. #GirlBoss – Sophia Amoruso
80. Siracusa – Delia Ephron
81. The Singles Game – Lauren Weisberger
82. Dying for Christmas – Tammy Cohen
83. The Girls – Emma Cline
84. The Woman in Cabin 10 – Ruth Ware
85. First Comes Love – Emily Giffin
86. The Pocket Wife – Susan Crawford
87. A Forgotten Affair – Kanchana Banerjee
88. Ms. Communications – Myra Kendrix
89. The Weekenders – Mary Kay Andrews
90. The Other Widow – Susan Crawford
91. Just Married, Please Excuse – Yashodhara Lal
92. The Ex – Alafair Burke
93. My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry – Fredrik Backman
94. Dangle – Sutapa Basu
95. This One is Mine – Maria Semple
96. Desperate in Dubai – Ameera Al Hakawati
97. Nowhere Girl – Umera Ahmed
98. Dark Matter – Blake Crouch
99. Safe Haven – Nicholas Sparks
100. Where’d You Go, Bernadette – Maria Semple
101. More Than Just Friends – Faraaz Kazi
102. Nutshell – Ian McEwan
103. Rekha-The Untold Story – Yasser Usman
104. The Chopin Manuscript – Jeffery Deaver & Others
105. Sully: My Search for What Really Matters – Chesley B. Sullenberger
106. The Copper Bracelet – Jeffery Deaver & Others
107. The Sialkot Saga – Ashwin Sanghi
108. Birds of Prey – Archana Sarat

Have you read any of these books that you enjoyed? What other books have you read this past year? I would love to hear about your favourites. Do share in the comments below so I can start building my TBR for 2017 🙂 .

Looking Back at 2015: My Year in Books

Time to pack away memories of old,
While we wait to unwrap what the New Year beholds.
The promise of a future that fulfils your dreams,
Hey 21st Century, Happy Sweet Sixteen!

A brand new year has dawned and while I look forward to all the excitement it promises to bring, I can’t help but look back at the wonderful year that went by, and rejoice in all the achievements it gave me. And to think that I didn’t even fulfill any resolutions!!!

Let’s be honest. Resolutions aren’t for me. I can make all the lists I want at the start of the year. But history has proven that the enthusiasm experienced in penning them down, lasts for only about a fortnight.

So I decided a long time ago, to not make any resolutions go forward. No preset targets, thank you very much. Instead, I will strive towards something and celebrate whatever I accomplish at the end of the year.

One such agenda that has been foremost on my mind for almost a decade, has been to reacquaint myself with a reading habit.

Up till college and even the earlier years of my professional career, I always managed to pull out time to read. I admit it wasn’t quite like it used to be when I was in school. Back then, we would time the days, graduating to the hours it took to finish a book. However, as life got busier and responsibilities heavier, I regretted being unable to read as voraciously as I used to.

In the last eight-nine years, I must have read, maybe ten books. (This figure is safely padded, in case I missed a title. So you get the drift.)

I did read a handful of Mills and Boon which are not included in this count – primarily because, well, they’re Mills and Boon! Reading them is like reading a magazine. You can finish one in as less as one hour. Believe me, I’ve timed it.

Fun Fact – I hadn’t read a Mills and Boon until 2007. And the reason why or rather how I actually did read one was because it came free with an issue of a home décor magazine.

So what inspired me to read again?

One of the largest national daily newspapers – The Hindustan Times, started a reading challenge in 2014 through their Sunday magazine – HT Brunch. The challenge was to read 24 books in the year and tweet your progress.

I couldn’t take part in 2014. But I decided to jump on the next train, with the 2nd edition of the challenge in 2015 – of reading 30 books. So I went online, ordered some books that were being talked about and set off on a roller coaster.

Once I started, I just couldn’t stop. I even found about a dozen dusty old paperbacks that I must have bought sometime in 2008 but never got down to reading. Long story short, I had finished reading 30 books before 6 months were up.

But that wasn’t the end. I was enjoying myself so much that I kept looking for new books – checking out bestseller lists, searching through publishers’ websites, visiting bookstores – both online and brick/mortar, for more reading material.

Twitter was also a great place for books. @HTBrunch published recommendations every few weeks. #BrunchBookChallenge revealed book titles other people were reading and what they thought about it. I was introduced to dozens of authors I had never even heard of and became part of an exciting new world – finding new books and meeting authors whose work I read and shared reviews of.

So at the end of the year, I had read 105 books in all. A staggering number I never thought I could achieve when I first set out. In fact, I read as many as 21 books in one month (that was in June and July, when New Delhi was at it’s hottest).

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The fiction genres I read included Rom-Coms; Thrillers – Crime, Legal, Psychological, Spy, even Romance; Young Adult; Historic Fiction; Pure Romance. In the non-fiction category, I read books on Creative Writing and Grammar (two of my most enjoyable reads), Memoirs and Biographies, Satire/Comedy, and even a book on a true double homicide that still remains unsolved.

I know a lot of you are eager to know my top reads from this reading challenge. So I am categorizing these in two groups – Indian authors and International authors.

Indian/Indian origin Authors (in random order)
1. Anything and everything written by Anuja Chauhan (The Zoya Factor, Battle For Bittora, Those Pricey Thakur Girls, The House That BJ Built)
2. The Shiva Trilogy – Amish Tripathi (The Immortals of Meluha, The Secret of the Nagas, The Oath of the Vayuputras)
3. Ravan & Eddie Trilogy – Kiran Nagarkar (Ravan & Eddie, The Extras, Rest in Peace : Ravan and Eddie)
4. Cuckold – Kiran Nagarkar
5. If Today Be Sweet – Thrity Umrigar
6. Mrs Funnybones – Twinkle Khanna
7. Me, Mia, Multiple – Debashish Irengbam
8. Engraved in Stone – Madhulika Liddle
9. The Bestseller She Wrote – Ravi Subramanian
10. Rajesh Khanna: The Untold Story of India’s First Superstar – Yasser Usman
11. A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth

International Authors (in random order)
1. Anything and everything written by Richard Castle (because I am a total fangirl when it comes to Castle – the popular US TV series)
2. Anything and everything written by Joseph Finder (Power Play, Suspicion, The Fixer, Company Man, Paranoia)
3. The Millennium Trilogy – Stieg Larsson (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played with Fire, The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest)
4. The Girl in the Spider’s Web – David Lagercrantz (A continuation of Stieg Larrson’s trilogy)
5. Gone Girl – Gillian Flynn
6. Angel – Colleen McCullough
7. This Charming Man – Marian Keyes
8. Passing Under Heaven – Justin Hill
9. The Woman Who Stole My Life – Marian Keyes
10. The Girl on the Train – Paula Hawkins
11. Memory Man – David Baldacci
12. All the Light We Cannot See – Anthony Doerr
13. The Nightingale – Kristin Hannah
14. Killing Monica – Candace Bushnell
15. Eats, Shoots & Leaves – Lynne Truss
16. Girl in the Dark – Anna Lyndsey
17. Pretty Baby – Mary Kubica
18. Saints of the Shadow Bible – Ian Rankin
19. Circling the Sun – Paula McLain
20. The Skin Collector – Jeffery Deaver

If you want to see the complete list of all 105 books, click here.

My rating for each of these books is available on my Goodreads account, and my Twitter page lists their tweeted reviews from when I read them.

If you are fond of reading and would like to take up a reading challenge, join the Brunch Book Challenge Part-3. It is a wonderful experience, guaranteed. For details, click here.

I would love to hear from you about the books you’ve read, the authors you love or any favourite series. Share your experiences about reading the good or the not so good books, in the comments section below.

Meanwhile, I have started my 2nd book of the year and can’t seem to put it down!