House of Discord by Sadiqa Peerbhoy | Book Review

There is an anonymous saying that family problems come in all shapes and sizes; some are short-lived and easily managed, while others are more chronic and difficult to handle. Somewhere, between these two ends of the scale, is where the story of Barrot House begins.

The Deshmukhs, residing in this rambling house in the heart of Bombay, are barely surviving. An effete father who shrugs reality, a rebellious son who marries a Muslim girl, a spinster daughter depressed with her flawed life, a resident ghost who is known to forewarn impending danger, and family secrets buried for decades that are clawing to get out. All of whom are bound together in a taut hold by a tough matriarch.

Outside Barrot House the post Babri-Masjid Bombay of 1992 is a city wallowing in hate, and when violence comes knocking on the Deshmukhs’ door, they find themselves in the eye of the storm.

Will the famed spirit of Bombay eventually rediscover the healing magic of communal tolerance? Will the Deshmukh family be able to bring down the walls they have built around their hearts and find the love that will help them survive?

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House of Discord begins with quite the thrill when a young boy sneaks into his house in the dead of the night, and the resident family ghost chooses that moment to make her presence known. From thereon, members (living and otherwise) of the Deshmukh family are introduced one by one, along with snippets of their family history thrown in for good measure.

The author unravels, layer by delicate layer, every fabric fold of Barrot House’s present and past, such that the layers appear almost fluid in their movement. She weaves her characters seamlessly into the story, taking time to acquaint the reader with each one of them.

While we learn about the turmoil in each of their individual lives, there appears to be a storm brewing behind the action, slowly and gradually making its way to Barrot House. That, coupled with the tensions in the Deshmukhs’ lives breaking surface, the story takes on a momentum making your heart beat faster as it lodges itself in your throat.

The city of Bombay plays an important role in the narrative. Known for its tolerance, its resilience is tested in the wake of the riots arising from the communal violence and the Deshmukhs find themselves surrounded. The scenes from this part of the story are described in vivid detail and bring back memories as if it all happened only yesterday.

The author has invested deeply in her characters and it shows in the way the unfolding events bring out their humane side despite their rebellious or antagonistic nature. One can’t help but fall in love with them for the sometimes subtle and sometimes grand change of heart.

The prose is picturesque and expressive; the language fluent and metaphorical. The narrative moves at a leisurely pace, bubbling slowly to a point where it suddenly bursts, turning the entire plot on its axis. It is the kind of writing a reader would undoubtedly enjoy losing themself in.

House of Discord is not just a saga about a family breaking apart in a city that is burning. It is a story of bonds that run far deeper than blood. Bonds that build love and compassion. That unite us in the face of adversity. No wonder they say, problems are like washing machines. They twist us, spin us and knock us around but in the end we come out cleaner, brighter and better than before.

House of Discord is a heartwarming story of just how that is possible despite the harsh, cruel, and turbulent world we live in.

Title: House of Discord
Author: Sadiqa Peerbhoy
Publisher: Readomania
ISBN: 978-93-858544-6-0
Edition/Year: First Edition 2017
Format: Paperback
Genre: Fiction
Pages: 298
Source: Publisher

Rating: 5 Stars

Available on Amazon.

About the Author: Sadiqa Peerbhoy was born in Hyderabad, grew up in Mumbai and lives in Bangalore. She has been an advertising professional all her working life and is the creative force behind many Indian and international brands. She started writing a humorous topical column in the local papers to keep her sanity in a deadline-ridden career and wrote it for thirty years, collecting a huge fan following in Bangalore. She has also scripted serials for television, scripts for BBC, short stories for the weekend papers, has four published books and many creativity awards. She ran a British college, Wigan and Leigh, in Bangalore and has taught advertising, brand building, life skills and lateral thinking in corporates and colleges.
Sadiqa is married to advertising legend Bunty Peerbhoy, is the mother of two, and remains an ardent student of Hindustani music.
She can be contacted on social media via Facebook and Twitter.

Note – I received this review copy from Readomania in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.

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Looking Forward to Spring | Short Story on Juggernaut

Whenever one of my stories get published somewhere, I start jumping with joy. Today, I have exactly one such reason to dance a little jig.

Looking Forward to Spring is a short story I wrote some time ago which has been published on the Juggernaut Writing  Platform.

It is a story of a young widow who is unsure how to answer her six year old son’s questions on bringing home a sibling and completing a family that has forever been left incomplete.

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The story is available to read for free on the Juggernaut website or mobile app here.

Do stop by to read and leave a short review. I hope you enjoy it 🙂

Book Announcement | When Women Speak Up

I am bursting with joy as I type this post to announce the release of a book that carries my name. This being the second such publication, in a span of a little over a year, I do believe the news accounts for a wonderful beginning to 2018.

This new book has been published by Women’s Web – A digital media platform that began with a firm conviction that women were more interested in the world around them than conventional magazines gave them credit for. They enable women to tell their stories, inspire other women, and be inspired by them too.

If you may recall, Women’s Web launched their first book – Kunti’s Confessions and Other Short Stories at the start of 2017 which featured my short story, ‘Personal Effects.

This year, they have launched another collection of inspiring stories titled When Women Speak Up and includes two short stories written by me:
A Step Out of the Box
A Matter Of Style

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Raised as ‘good girls’, we are often told that we must know our place, we must stay quiet to ‘avoid trouble’, and of course, that men don’t like women who are ‘too bold’.

Indian women today are breaking all those norms and stereotypes! This powerful collection of short stories will show you exactly how.

From re-imagining characters from India’s best loved epics, to utterly relatable stories set in urban bedrooms, kitchens and offices, these 19 stories capture the angst, the struggle, and the joy, of women speaking up. Sometimes, when you have trouble finding your own voice, you may even want to look back to them for a little dose of inspiration!

The book is now live on Amazon and you can buy it here: When Women Speak Up: A Women’s Web Collection of Inspiring Stories

I would love for you all to read it. I guarantee these inspiring short stories are highly readable and will have you rooting for their protagonists.

Please, do also leave your reviews on Amazon and Goodreads so others may be inspired to read it too 🙂

Image Courtesy – Women’s Web

 

The Woman Who Saw the Future by Amit Sharma | Book Review

Dreams. The result of our subconscious thought. Generated from the blankness of our mind. Disintegrated into the vast nothingness of our lives. We hope for them to be a peak into our future. We see them as a window to our past. They are manifested into our intuitive power. A gut feeling, a sixth sense, a premonition.

Khalil Gibran said, Trust in dreams, for in them is hidden the gate to eternity. But can dreams tell us the truth? Can premonitions show us the future?

Amit Sharma, in his new book: The Woman Who Saw the Future, spins an intriguing story around the concept.

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Sapna Vaid, a timid, wide-eyed, college-going girl, has lived with a unique power for a decade; a power that has turned her into the most influential and powerful Goddess on Earth. Sapna can see the future by way of premonitions that haunt her at night, where death and blood await her in her dreams. She saves thousands of people around the world every year through her record-breaking, popular show ‘Lucky People’. The show has given Sapna’s life a meaning and gives her the courage to sleep every night.

Even though the world is at her feet, this power costs Sapna her personal life. Broken relationships and separation from her son bring her unbearable pain. Her parents and the thousands of prayers that come her way every year are her only solace, her only reason to live. When blinding hatred leads to a desperate act of revenge, a single misuse of her great power triggers a reversal of her fortunes. Now she must decide the path she has to take to preserve her unique gift and her fame, even if it turns her into a murderer on the brink of insanity.

To find out more about this unusual book, read my detailed review as published at Writersmelon.com.

Bonus: Checkout my interview with the Author, here.

Title: The Woman Who Saw the Future
Author: Amit Sharma
Publisher: Readomania
ISBN: 978-93-858545-5-2
Edition/Year: First Edition 2017
Format: Paperback
Genre: Fiction
Pages: 276
Source: Personal Copy
Rating: 4 Stars

Available on Amazon.

About the Author: Amit Sharma is an IT slave (read professional) since the last twelve years. He lives with his family in NCR but his work does take him to foreign lands. His wife was a teacher till she gave it up because of sheer exhaustion of answering questions of their four-year-old daughter all day.
His first fiction book, False Ceilings, a family saga spanning one hundred and thirty years, was published by Lifi Publications in 2016. The book garnered many good reviews on Amazon and Goodreads, and critical acclaim.
Amit’s hobbies include reading, watching world cinema, travelling, digging into various cuisines, cooking, listening to music, painting, blogging, making his daughter laugh and helping his wife with her unnecessary and prolonged shopping.
To read more about him, visit http://amit-sharma.co.in/ or connect with him on social media via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

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When I Hit You: Or, a Portrait of the Writer as a Young Wife by Meena Kandasamy | Book Review

One can beat around the bush as much as one wants, but the fact of the matter remains: Violence against the women and girls is considered to be one of the most prevalent human rights violations worldwide. The United Nations Population Fund, in a 2015 report, states that “one in three women will experience physical or sexual abuse in her lifetime”.

I have always been troubled as to why women suffer from domestic violence. Why do they need to stay in such a relationship? Why don’t they just walk out? What holds them back?

Meena Kandasamy, in her novel – When I Hit You: Or, A Portrait of the Writer as a Young Wife – writes a hard-hitting account of a writer’s marriage in an effort to lift the veil on the silence that surrounds domestic violence and marital rape in modern India.

She addresses compelling questions in her lyrical style of writing that is poetic and draws you into it’s prose. The incidents she describes play havoc with your mind, and they are not even a fraction of what the victim would have experienced.

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A fictional novel, When I Hit You is inspired by the author’s personal experience. Nonetheless, despite all that she has been through, the narrator does not lose her faith in love. She continues to believe in it, albeit brokenheartedly.

When I Hit You is a lesson to not let your loyalty become slavery. Any relationship, when becomes overbearing, needs to be terminated. One always needs to remember that one can always get out.

And when you have gotten out, then, as Rumi said: “You have escaped the cage. Your wings are stretched out. Now fly.”

To find out more about this book, read my detailed review as published at Writersmelon.com.

Title: When I Hit You: Or, a Portrait of the Writer as a Young Wife
Author: Meena Kandasamy
Publisher: Juggernaut Books
ISBN: 978-93-862283-0-7
Edition/Year: First Edition 2017
Format: Hardcover
Genre: Fiction
Pages: 272
Source: Personal Copy
Rating: 4 Stars

Available on Amazon.

About the Author: Meena Kandasamy has actively sought to combine her love for the written word with the struggle for social justice through poetry, translation, fiction and essays for the last fifteen years. Her debut collection of poems, Touch, was themed around caste and untouchability, and her second, Ms Militancy, was an explosive, feminist retelling/reclaiming of Tamil and Hindu myths. Her critically acclaimed first (anti)novel, The Gypsy Goddess, smudged the line between powerful fiction and fearsome critique in narrating the 1968 massacre of forty-four landless untouchable men, women and children striking for higher wages in the village of Kilvenmani, Tanjore. When I Hit You: Or, a Portrait of the Writer as a Young Wife is her second novel.
She grew up in Chennai, India where she lived most of her life before moving to London in 2016.
She was a fellow of the International Writing Program (IWP) at the University of Iowa in 2009, and a British Council Charles Wallace India Trust Fellow at the University of Kent in 2011. She holds a PhD in sociolinguistics. Her work has appeared in eighteen languages.
To read more about her, visit https://www.kandasamy.co.uk/ or connect with her on social media via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

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A Day in Early Spring |Telegram Magazine | February 2017

Here is a magazine that has gained quite a following among writers since its launch in July last year. A literary magazine, Telegram aims to rekindle the flames of quality Indian fiction. They are a monthly journal of short stories, essays, book reviews, poems and much more. As the literary magazine culture disappears from the country’s newsstands, coffee houses and bookstores, it leaves a gaping hole for the discerning reader. Telegram hopes to cause a ripple in the direction of good stories, fiction and essays.

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Out with their eighth issue this month, the magazine includes a short story written by me for their February theme: Shades of Love.

Even though global warming and climate change have impacted our weather cycles, the month of February can’t help but evoke a warm, fuzzy feeling inside. Add to that, Valentine’s Day bombards everyone’s timelines and love dominate our feeds, from which there is no escape.

A Day in Early Spring celebrates just one such love story where the fragrance of soon-to-arrive spring, coupled with the blissfulness of love, is enough to wrap you in its enigma.

The issue is now live on Magzter.com, the world’s largest and fastest growing cross-platform global digital magazine newsstand.

Click here, to read it online or download to your Android/iPad/iPhone device, and revel in its ode to love.

Image Courtesy – Telegram Magazine

A Step Out of the Box | Winner for February 2017 Muse of the Month on Women’s Web

As those of you following my writing are aware, Women’s Web runs a monthly contest on its website, based on a writing prompt.

In 2016, these writing prompts were either a direct quote from the featured author of the month, or a quote from one of their published works.

In 2017, Women’s Web introduced a new Muse of the Month series, one with a contemporary twist. Instead of selecting a quote or phrase from a book, the cue is a feminist GIF/video clip from a movie – either Bollywood or Hollywood.

For February 2017, the writing cue was a scene from the film Piku, where Piku confirms that if her friend wants to marry her, her 90 year old father comes along with her.

Animated GIF  - Find & Share on GIPHY
via GIPHY

My entry for this month, based on the above cue, is titled ‘A Step Out of the Box’. It discusses the dilemma a married woman faces, in providing care for her ageing father who is living alone, away from his children. The story touches upon a concept that is still alien, but calls for attention in today’s times to bring a progressive change in our society.

To read the complete story, click on the Facebook post below.

Media Courtesy: giphy.com

Following Rules – Short Story on Readomania

Here is another short story, which was written in the genre of humour/satire, sometime last year. It received a very special mention for the quality of writing and has now been published on the Readomania website.

Following Rules is a humourous take on how we, as a society, tend to complain about issues which, in fact, may have been created by us.

Pratichi considers herself to be a responsible driver who stays within the confines of road and traffic rules. She is also a bit a feminist, and believes women drivers are unnecessarily given a bad name.

So how does she manage when she is running terribly late on one of the most important days of her life? Can she stick to the rules while all the rule breakers zip past her? Or will she succumb to the pressures of traffic.

Find out more by reading the full story at Readomania.com.

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If you have any such crazy traffic experiences to share; they could be yours or someone else’s; tell me, so we can all have a hearty laugh together. 🙂

Image courtesy: Google Images.

Book Announcement – Kunti’s Confessions and Other Short Stories

The year 2017 could not have started on a sweeter note for me. Earlier this month, Women’s Web announced a book containing short stories that represent the very best of short fiction published on their website in 2016. I am honoured and thrilled that this book includes a short story written by me.

Kunti’s Confessions and Other Short Stories, was launched on 7th January 2017 at the Orange Flower Awards in Bangalore.

Drawing inspiration from leading contemporary female authors in India today, including Anuja Chauhan, Anita Nair, Jaishree Misra, Jhumpa Lahiri and Namita Gokhale, every month readers of Women’s Web send in their own short fiction based on a writing cue from a novel by one such author.

Fifteen of these short stories have found their way into this book and they reflect some of the quiet joys as well as deepest fears of Indian women today.

My story, Personal Effects was selected as a winning entry for their December Muse of the Month Writing Contest and I have received wonderful reviews for it from the Women’s Web community of readers, and friends. No doubt, it comes as a wonderful surprise that it is included in this publication.

The book is now available for purchase on Amazon (as ebook) and Pothi (paperback).

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I am positive you will enjoy reading this as each of these stories emerge from the reality of women’s lives today and will therefore, resonate with all of you.

Don’t forget to leave your feedback on Amazon and Goodreads.

Image Courtesy – Women’s Web

Time to Smell the Flowers | #ILoveMyWork | Writersmelon

Back in November 2016, Writersmelon gave a writing prompt and asked to spin a little story around it.

The prompt was #ILoveMyWork and the idea was to write about the work you do, the work you’d love to do or whether the work that you’re doing is what you love.

An hour before the deadline, a limerick popped in my head which I recalled from something I wrote about a year ago. I thought it would make for an interesting insight into the work I did before and what I did now.

So I added about 150 words to it, just to make it worth its literary weight (in the literal sense), and sent it off as a laugh.

No wonder it came as a surprise when it got selected in the Top 10 entries.

Read it here: Time To Smell The Flowers. I am sure many of you will relate to it.

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Image Source: Stock Image from Dreamstime.com as also used on Writersmelon.com